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National Public Health Week

NPHW 2020 DAILY THEMES

Everyone deserves to live a long and healthy life in a safe environment. To make that possible, we need to address the causes of poor health and disease risk among individuals and within our communities. Where we live, learn, work, worship and play affects each of us and can determine our health and life expectancy. In the workplace, let’s partner across public and private sectors to make sure decisions are made with the public’s health in mind. Within our communities, let’s start new conversations with our neighbors and become advocates for positive change. Working together, we can build healthier communities and eventually, the healthiest nation. But we need your help to get there.

During each day of National Public Health Week, we focus on a particular public health topic. Then, we identify ways each of us can make a difference on that topic. These areas are critical to our future success in creating the healthiest nation, and everyone can do their part to help.

NPHW 2020 DAILY THEMES

Monday: Mental Health — advocate for and promote emotional well-being

Tuesday: Maternal and Child Health — ensure the health of mothers and babies throughout the lifespan

Wednesday: Violence Prevention — reduce personal and community violence to improve health

Thursday: Environmental Health — help protect and maintain a healthy planet

Friday: Education — advocate for quality education and schools

Saturday: Healthy Housing — ensure access to affordable and safe housing

Sunday: Economics — advocate for economic empowerment as the key to a healthy life

 

COVID-19 AND DAILY THEMES

MONDAY: MENTAL HEALTH — advocate for and promote emotional well-being

COVID-19 is causing heightened levels of stress. In particular, isolation and quarantine can be highly stressful. As can separation from loved ones, especially those detained off-shore or in other countries. And many in the public health and health care sectors, as well as those working in affected industries, are shouldering a significant mental health burden.

Reach out and check on your loved ones and community members. And read and share such resources as the World Health Organization's Mental Health Considerations During COVID-19 Outbreak and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's tips on managing anxiety and stress. 

TUESDAY: MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH — ensure the health of mothers and babies throughout the lifespan

Research to date finds pregnant women and young children do not seem to be more susceptible to COVID-19. If anything, women (in general) may have a survival advantage over men (In China, 2.8% of infected men have died, compared to 1.7% of women). 

Stilll, pregnant women and children are considered "at-risk populations" and need some special support during the pandemic. Check out the Kaiser Family Foundation's issue brief Novel Coronavirus "COVID-19": Special Considerations for Pregnant Women. HealthyChildren.org has a COVID-19 page for children and families. The American Academy of Pediatrics offers links to clinical guidance and other resources, while the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has posted a practice advisory.

WEDNESDAY: VIOLENCE PREVENTION — reduce personal and community violence to improve health

Increased stress can lead to increased aggression, feeding a cycle of violence especially in communities already under strain. And, as APHA member Elena Ong writes in this Public Health Newswire post, "Since the first case of the new coronavirus was reported in Wuhan, China, in December, there’s been a surge in reports of microaggressions, discrimination and violent attacks against people who look Chinese or Asian."

Much of the stress people are feeling as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic is linked to fear fed by misinformation. Help counteract the "infodemic" of bad and troubling information by sharing WHO's mythbusters and resources on APHA's COVID-19 page and Get Ready site. And as Ong reminds us, "let’s fight fear-mongering with principled and visionary leadership."

THURSDAY: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH — help protect and maintain a healthy planet

In perhaps one of the few silver linings of the COVID-19 pandemic, air pollution, specifically CO2 levels, diminished in Italy due to dramatic lifestyle changes. Yet as always, changes in people’s lifestyle patterns can have unexpected consequences on our environment. For now, remain vigilant in recycling plastics. If you are sick, dispose of soiled items by double-bagging in secured containers with lids. Continue to advocate for increased funding to improve our water infrastructure and adequate funding to support public health workers in monitoring, preparing for and responding to the health effects of climate change.

FRIDAY: EDUCATION — advocate for quality education and schools

As with any illness, reliance on science-based information and response is key. Schools at all levels should be engaged in active surveillance and communicate with their state and local public health departments should a person display possible COVID-19 symptoms. Distance learning is now more necessary than ever, heightening the need for access to technology and high-speed internet As schools are often the key source of daily nutrition for students in low-income families, school systems are now called on to find ways to distribute meals while maintaining social distancing.

Reach out to your local school system to see if volunteers are needed, whether for meal distribution, online learning support or other tasks. If you've found yourself suddenly at home with your school-aged children, CDC has advice on how to talk to them about COVID-19, as does the National Association of School Psychologists.

SATURDAY: HEALTHY HOMES — ensure access to affordable and safe housing

During the COVID-19 quarantine, people are spending even more time in their homes than usual. For those living in unsafe environments, problems like mold and secondhand smoke exposure can worsen existing health conditions.

Share CDC's workplace, home and school guidance. And while designed to help people prepare their homes for an outbreak, CDC's Protect Your Home page is still useful now, in the midst of the pandemic. The National Center for Healthy Housing's Fact Sheets, Checklists and Guides page offers links on ways to keep your home safe, the costs of home upkeep and seasonal maintenance checklists.

SUNDAY: ECONOMICS — advocate for economic empowerment as the key to a healthy life

One of the most dramatic reactions to COVID-19 has been that of the stock markets and the underlying industries they represent. It already appears clear that many industries and their employees will suffer a significant financial hardship. On an individual level, the burden of being out of work and (potentially) hospitalized for an extended period of time can have disastrous impacts on financial health.

Advocate for paid sick leave and a living wage. Urge your members of Congress to prioritize public health infrastructure and paid sick, family and medical leave in any future legislation to address the COVID-19 pandemic.

Go here for additional links and resources specific to COVID-19 and NPHW.

These tips brought to you by the Delaware Academy of Medicine/Delaware Public Health Association and APHA.

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